Đề thi THPTQG Trường THPT Đan Phượng Hà Nội Môn: Tiếng Anh Năm 2020

In đề thi  
; Môn học: ; Lớp: ; 50 câu hỏi; Làm trong 60 phút; cập nhật 03/04/2020
Thời gian làm bài thi 60 phút
Hướng dẫn làm bài thi
Bắt đầu làm bài thi
Hãy nhấn vào nút bắt đầu để thi thử trực tuyến.
Môn học Cập nhật 03/04/2020
Lớp, cấp Số câu hỏi 50 câu
Lượt xem 1,083 lượt xem Lượt thi 33 lượt thi

Câu 1

Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the word whose underlined part differs from the other three in
pronunciation in each of the following questions.
Question 1.

A.

sacred

B.

hatred

C.

celebrated

D.

prepared

Câu 2

Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the word whose underlined part differs from the other three in
pronunciation in each of the following questions.
Question 2.

A.

escape

B.

special

C.

island

D.

isolate

Câu 3

Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the word that differs from the other three in the position of
primary stress in each of the following questions.
Question 3.

A.

influential

B.

creative

C.

introduction

D.

university

Câu 4

Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the word that differs from the other three in the position of
primary stress in each of the following questions.
Question 4.

A.

aesthetic

B.

particular

C.

disease

D.

acceptability

Câu 5

Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the underlined part that needs correction in each of the following
questions.
Question 5.
 American painter Georgia O’Keeffe is well known as her large paintings of flowers in which
single blossoms are presented as if in close-up.

A.

as

B.

in which

C.

blossoms

D.

close-up

Câu 6

Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the underlined part that needs correction in each of the following
questions.
Question 6.
Although this car appears to be manufactured by a different company, it has the same body
style, size, and perform as that one.

A.

appears

B.

to be

C.

different

D.

perform

Câu 7

Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the underlined part that needs correction in each of the following
questions.
Question 7
. Although her severe pain, she tried to walk to the auditorium to attend the meeting.

A.

Although

B.

severe

C.

to walk

D.

to attend

Câu 8

Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
following questions.
Question 8.
Luckily, by the time we got there, the painting ______

A.

didn’t sell

B.

hadn’t been sold

C.

wasn’t sold

D.

hadn’t sold

Câu 9

Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
following questions.
Question 9.
I remember _______ the letter a few days before going on holiday.

A.

to receive

B.

to have received

C.

received

D.

receiving

Câu 10

Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
following questions.
Question 10.
Two grams of butter _________ in this recipe.

A.

is needed

B.

need

C.

are needed

D.

needs

Câu 11

Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
following questions.
Question 11.
There is one person to ________ I owe more than I can say..

A.

whom

B.

who

C.

that

D.

whose

Câu 12

Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
following questions.
Question 12
. Had you known that the river was dangerous, he _______ to swim across it.

A.

would have tried

B.

would try

C.

will not try

D.

wouldn’t have tried

Câu 13

Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
following questions.
Question 13.
Humans depend on species ________ to provide food, clean air and water.

A.

seperation

B.

division

C.

diversity

D.

difference

Câu 14

Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
following questions.
Question 14.
My car is quite _______ .

A.

economical

B.

economic

C.

economics

D.

economy

Câu 15

Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
following questions.
Question 15.
In order to avoid boredom, the most important thing is to keep oneself ______

A.

occupation

B.

occupied

C.

occupational

D.

preoccupied

Câu 16

Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
following questions.
Question 16.
Don’t be impatient ! I ‘m sure he will turn ________ on time

A.

up

B.

round

C.

on

D.

off

Câu 17

Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
following questions.
Question 17.
You’d better _____ animal fat if you want to lower your cholesterol.

A.

cut off

B.

put away

C.

cut down on

D.

put up with

Câu 18

Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
following questions.
Question 18.
Our project was successful ________ its practicality.

A.

in terms of

B.

with a view to

C.

regardless

D.

on behalf of

Câu 19

Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
following questions.
Question 19.
In the middle of the blue river__________.

A.

does a tiny violet flower emerge

B.

did a tiny violet flower emerge

C.

emerge a tiny violet flower

D.

emerged a tiny violet flower

Câu 20

Mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to indicate the most suitable response to
complete each of the following exchanges.
Question 20. “Let me drive you home.” “ ___________”

A.

No problem.

B.

Don’t worry. I’m all right.

C.

I usually drive home at five.

D.

It’s me.

Câu 21

Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the word(s) CLOSEST in meaning to the underlined word(s) in
the following questions.
Question 21.
When you see your friend off, you say ‘ _______!’

A.

Lucky you

B.

Have a good journey

C.

Good night

D.

See you later

Câu 22

Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the word(s) CLOSEST in meaning to the underlined word(s) in
the following questions.
Question 22.
 John wants to buy a new car, so he starts setting aside a small part of his monthly earnings.

A.

using up

B.

putting out

C.

spending on

D.

saving up

Câu 23

Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the word(s) CLOSEST in meaning to the underlined word(s) in
the following questions.
Question 23.
The works of such men as the English philosophers John Locke and Thomas Hobbes
helped pave the way for academic freedom in the modern sense.

A.

terminate

B.

prevent

C.

initiate

D.

lighten

Câu 24

Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the word(s) OPPOSITE in meaning to the underlined word(s) in
each of the following questions.
Question 24
.Fruit and vegetables grew in abundance on the island. The islanders even exported the
surplus.

A.

excess

B.

large quantity

C.

small quantity

D.

sufficiency

Câu 25

Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the word(s) OPPOSITE in meaning to the underlined word(s) in
each of the following questions.
Question 25.
Televisions are a standard feature in most hotel rooms.

A.

abnormal

B.

common

C.

customary

D.

typical

Câu 26

Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the sentence that is closest in
meaning to each of the following questions.
Question 26. She said it had nothing to do with me.

A.

She told me that it was none of my business.

B.

She told me that it had done nothing for me.

C.

She said I did nothing about it.

D.

She said she had done nothing for me.

Câu 27

Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the sentence that is closest in
meaning to each of the following questions.
Question 27.
Members are reminded that they are responsible for any damage caused by their
guests.

A.

If your guests break anything, you’ll have to pay.

B.

If guests are hurt, members have to look after them.

C.

Please don’t let guests make too much noise.

D.

Please remember to look after guests very politely.

Câu 28

Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the sentence that is closest in
meaning to each of the following questions.
Question 28. This material is suitable for students of eighteen years and up.

A.

The material may be suitable for students of over eighteen years of age.

B.

This material is suitable for students who are over eighteen.

C.

Only 18-year-old students will find this material suitable.

D.

Students of eighteen years and over can use this material.

Câu 29

Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the sentence that best combines
each pair of sentences in the following questions.
Question 29. There is an important difference between humans and chimpanzees. Chimpanzees
walk on four legs.

A.

There is an important difference between humans and chimpanzees that walk on four legs.

B.

Chimpanzees walk on four legs, so they are importantly different from humans.

C.

An important difference between humans and chimpanzees is that chimpanzees walk on four legs.

D.

There are important differences between humans and chimpanzees one of which is that chimpanzees walk
on four legs.

Câu 30

Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the sentence that best combines
each pair of sentences in the following questions.
Question 30. There were over two hundred people at Carl's trial, most of whom believed that he
was not guilty of the crime.

A.

Carl had not committed the crime, and so more than 200 people came to his trial to show their support.

B.

The majority of more than 200 people at Carl's trial didn't think that he had committed the crime.

C.

Over 200 people coming to Carl's trial must have influenced the fact that he was not found guilty of the
crime.

D.

When it was announced that Carl had been found not guilty of the crime, there were over 200 people in
the audience at his trial.

Câu 31

Read the following passage and choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the correct word or phrase that
best fits each of the following blanks.

Voluntary work is work that you do not get paid for and usually involves doing things to help other people,
especially the elderly or the sick or working on (31)______ of a charity or similar organization. Most charitable
organizations rely on unpaid volunteers, and thousands of Americans and British people give many hours of
their time to doing some form of social work or organizing fund- raising events to support the work.
Volunteering is especially popular in the US and the reasons this may be found in (32)______ American
values such as the Protestant work ethic, the idea that work improves the person who does it, and the belief
that people can change their condition if they try hard enough.
In the US young people over 18 can take part in AmeriCorps, a government program that (33)______
them to work as volunteers for a period of time, with the promise of help in paying for their education later.
Older Americans who do not work may spend much of their free time volunteering.
In Britain a lot of voluntary work is directed towards supporting the country’s social services. The WRVS
and other organizations run a meals on wheels service in many parts of Britain, provide hot meals for old
people who are (34)______ to cook for themselves. The nationwide Citizens Advice Bureau, which offers free
advice to the public on a wide range of issues, is run mainly by volunteers, and the Blood Transfusion Service
relies on voluntary blood donors to give blood for use in hospitals. Political parties use volunteers at election
time, and Churches depend on volunteers to (35) _______ building clean.
Question 31.

A.

behalf

B.

basic

C.

account

D.

ground

Câu 32

Read the following passage and choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the correct word or phrase that
best fits each of the following blanks.

Voluntary work is work that you do not get paid for and usually involves doing things to help other people,
especially the elderly or the sick or working on (31)______ of a charity or similar organization. Most charitable
organizations rely on unpaid volunteers, and thousands of Americans and British people give many hours of
their time to doing some form of social work or organizing fund- raising events to support the work.
Volunteering is especially popular in the US and the reasons this may be found in (32)______ American
values such as the Protestant work ethic, the idea that work improves the person who does it, and the belief
that people can change their condition if they try hard enough.
In the US young people over 18 can take part in AmeriCorps, a government program that (33)______
them to work as volunteers for a period of time, with the promise of help in paying for their education later.
Older Americans who do not work may spend much of their free time volunteering.
In Britain a lot of voluntary work is directed towards supporting the country’s social services. The WRVS
and other organizations run a meals on wheels service in many parts of Britain, provide hot meals for old
people who are (34)______ to cook for themselves. The nationwide Citizens Advice Bureau, which offers free
advice to the public on a wide range of issues, is run mainly by volunteers, and the Blood Transfusion Service
relies on voluntary blood donors to give blood for use in hospitals. Political parties use volunteers at election
time, and Churches depend on volunteers to (35) _______ building clean.
Question 32.

A.

core

B.

primary

C.

top

D.

essential

Câu 33

Read the following passage and choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the correct word or phrase that
best fits each of the following blanks.

Voluntary work is work that you do not get paid for and usually involves doing things to help other people,
especially the elderly or the sick or working on (31)______ of a charity or similar organization. Most charitable
organizations rely on unpaid volunteers, and thousands of Americans and British people give many hours of
their time to doing some form of social work or organizing fund- raising events to support the work.
Volunteering is especially popular in the US and the reasons this may be found in (32)______ American
values such as the Protestant work ethic, the idea that work improves the person who does it, and the belief
that people can change their condition if they try hard enough.
In the US young people over 18 can take part in AmeriCorps, a government program that (33)______
them to work as volunteers for a period of time, with the promise of help in paying for their education later.
Older Americans who do not work may spend much of their free time volunteering.
In Britain a lot of voluntary work is directed towards supporting the country’s social services. The WRVS
and other organizations run a meals on wheels service in many parts of Britain, provide hot meals for old
people who are (34)______ to cook for themselves. The nationwide Citizens Advice Bureau, which offers free
advice to the public on a wide range of issues, is run mainly by volunteers, and the Blood Transfusion Service
relies on voluntary blood donors to give blood for use in hospitals. Political parties use volunteers at election
time, and Churches depend on volunteers to (35) _______ building clean.
Question 33.

A.

commissions

B.

guides

C.

encourages

D.

demands

Câu 34

Read the following passage and choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the correct word or phrase that
best fits each of the following blanks.

Voluntary work is work that you do not get paid for and usually involves doing things to help other people,
especially the elderly or the sick or working on (31)______ of a charity or similar organization. Most charitable
organizations rely on unpaid volunteers, and thousands of Americans and British people give many hours of
their time to doing some form of social work or organizing fund- raising events to support the work.
Volunteering is especially popular in the US and the reasons this may be found in (32)______ American
values such as the Protestant work ethic, the idea that work improves the person who does it, and the belief
that people can change their condition if they try hard enough.
In the US young people over 18 can take part in AmeriCorps, a government program that (33)______
them to work as volunteers for a period of time, with the promise of help in paying for their education later.
Older Americans who do not work may spend much of their free time volunteering.
In Britain a lot of voluntary work is directed towards supporting the country’s social services. The WRVS
and other organizations run a meals on wheels service in many parts of Britain, provide hot meals for old
people who are (34)______ to cook for themselves. The nationwide Citizens Advice Bureau, which offers free
advice to the public on a wide range of issues, is run mainly by volunteers, and the Blood Transfusion Service
relies on voluntary blood donors to give blood for use in hospitals. Political parties use volunteers at election
time, and Churches depend on volunteers to (35) _______ building clean.
Question 34.

A.

incapable

B.

unable

C.

enabled

D.

offering

Câu 35

Read the following passage and choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the correct word or phrase that
best fits each of the following blanks.

Voluntary work is work that you do not get paid for and usually involves doing things to help other people,
especially the elderly or the sick or working on (31)______ of a charity or similar organization. Most charitable
organizations rely on unpaid volunteers, and thousands of Americans and British people give many hours of
their time to doing some form of social work or organizing fund- raising events to support the work.
Volunteering is especially popular in the US and the reasons this may be found in (32)______ American
values such as the Protestant work ethic, the idea that work improves the person who does it, and the belief
that people can change their condition if they try hard enough.
In the US young people over 18 can take part in AmeriCorps, a government program that (33)______
them to work as volunteers for a period of time, with the promise of help in paying for their education later.
Older Americans who do not work may spend much of their free time volunteering.
In Britain a lot of voluntary work is directed towards supporting the country’s social services. The WRVS
and other organizations run a meals on wheels service in many parts of Britain, provide hot meals for old
people who are (34)______ to cook for themselves. The nationwide Citizens Advice Bureau, which offers free
advice to the public on a wide range of issues, is run mainly by volunteers, and the Blood Transfusion Service
relies on voluntary blood donors to give blood for use in hospitals. Political parties use volunteers at election
time, and Churches depend on volunteers to (35) _______ building clean.
Question 35.

A.

stay

B.

keep

C.

help

D.

get

Câu 36

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate
the correct answer to each of the questions from 36 to 42.

We live in a world of tired, sleep deprived people. In his book Counting Sheep, Paul Martin – a behavioural
biologist – describes a society which is just too busy to sleep and which does not give sleeping the
importance it deserves.
Modern society has invented reasons not to sleep. We are now a 24/7 society where shops and services
must be available all hours. We spend longer hours at work than we used to, and more time getting to work.
Mobile phones and email allow us to stay in touch round the clock and late-night TV and the Internet tempt
us away from our beds. When we need more time for work or pleasure, the easy solution is to sleep less. The
average adult sleeps only 6.2 hours a night during the week, whereas research shows that most people need
eight or even eight and a half hours’ sleep to feel at their best. Nowadays, many people have got used to
sleeping less than they need and they live in an almost permanent state of ‘sleep debt’.
Until the invention of the electric light in 1879 our daily cycle of sleep used to depend on the hours of
daylight. People would get up with the sun and go to bed at nightfall. But nowadays our hours of sleep are
mainly determined by our working hours (or our social life) and most people are woken up artificially by an
alarm clock. During the day caffeine, the world’s most popular drug, helps to keep us awake. 75% of the
world’s population habitually consume caffeine, which up to a point masks the symptoms of sleep
deprivation.
What does a chronic lack of sleep do to us? As well as making us irritable and unhappy as humans, it also
reduces our motivation and ability to work. This has serious implications for society in general. Doctors, for
example, are often chronically sleep deprived, especially when they are on ‘night call’, and may get less than
three hours’ sleep. Lack of sleep can seriously impair their mood, judgment, and ability to take decisions.
Tired engineers, in the early hours of the morning, made a series of mistakes with catastrophic results. On
our roads and motorways lack of sleep kills thousands of people every year. Tests show that a tired driver can
be just as dangerous as a drunken driver. However, driving when drunk is against the law but driving when
exhausted isn’t. As Paul Martin says, it is very ironic that we admire people who function on very little sleep
instead of criticizing them for being irresponsible. Our world would be a much safer, happier place if
everyone, whatever their job, slept eight hours a night.
  New English File Upper-intermediate by Clive Oxenden and Christina Latham-Koenig, OUP
Question 36: The phrase “round the clock” in the second paragraph is similar in meaning
to______.

A.

surrounded with clocks

B.

all day and night

C.

during the daytime

D.

having a round clock

Câu 37

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate
the correct answer to each of the questions from 36 to 42.

We live in a world of tired, sleep deprived people. In his book Counting Sheep, Paul Martin – a behavioural
biologist – describes a society which is just too busy to sleep and which does not give sleeping the
importance it deserves.
Modern society has invented reasons not to sleep. We are now a 24/7 society where shops and services
must be available all hours. We spend longer hours at work than we used to, and more time getting to work.
Mobile phones and email allow us to stay in touch round the clock and late-night TV and the Internet tempt
us away from our beds. When we need more time for work or pleasure, the easy solution is to sleep less. The
average adult sleeps only 6.2 hours a night during the week, whereas research shows that most people need
eight or even eight and a half hours’ sleep to feel at their best. Nowadays, many people have got used to
sleeping less than they need and they live in an almost permanent state of ‘sleep debt’.
Until the invention of the electric light in 1879 our daily cycle of sleep used to depend on the hours of
daylight. People would get up with the sun and go to bed at nightfall. But nowadays our hours of sleep are
mainly determined by our working hours (or our social life) and most people are woken up artificially by an
alarm clock. During the day caffeine, the world’s most popular drug, helps to keep us awake. 75% of the
world’s population habitually consume caffeine, which up to a point masks the symptoms of sleep
deprivation.
What does a chronic lack of sleep do to us? As well as making us irritable and unhappy as humans, it also
reduces our motivation and ability to work. This has serious implications for society in general. Doctors, for
example, are often chronically sleep deprived, especially when they are on ‘night call’, and may get less than
three hours’ sleep. Lack of sleep can seriously impair their mood, judgment, and ability to take decisions.
Tired engineers, in the early hours of the morning, made a series of mistakes with catastrophic results. On
our roads and motorways lack of sleep kills thousands of people every year. Tests show that a tired driver can
be just as dangerous as a drunken driver. However, driving when drunk is against the law but driving when
exhausted isn’t. As Paul Martin says, it is very ironic that we admire people who function on very little sleep
instead of criticizing them for being irresponsible. Our world would be a much safer, happier place if
everyone, whatever their job, slept eight hours a night.
  New English File Upper-intermediate by Clive Oxenden and Christina Latham-Koenig, OUP
Question 37: The writer mentions the Internet in the passage as______.

A.

a temptation that prevents us from sleeping

B.

an easy solution to sleep deprivation

C.

an ineffective means of communication

D.

a factor that is not related to sleep deprivation

Câu 38

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate
the correct answer to each of the questions from 36 to 42.

We live in a world of tired, sleep deprived people. In his book Counting Sheep, Paul Martin – a behavioural
biologist – describes a society which is just too busy to sleep and which does not give sleeping the
importance it deserves.
Modern society has invented reasons not to sleep. We are now a 24/7 society where shops and services
must be available all hours. We spend longer hours at work than we used to, and more time getting to work.
Mobile phones and email allow us to stay in touch round the clock and late-night TV and the Internet tempt
us away from our beds. When we need more time for work or pleasure, the easy solution is to sleep less. The
average adult sleeps only 6.2 hours a night during the week, whereas research shows that most people need
eight or even eight and a half hours’ sleep to feel at their best. Nowadays, many people have got used to
sleeping less than they need and they live in an almost permanent state of ‘sleep debt’.
Until the invention of the electric light in 1879 our daily cycle of sleep used to depend on the hours of
daylight. People would get up with the sun and go to bed at nightfall. But nowadays our hours of sleep are
mainly determined by our working hours (or our social life) and most people are woken up artificially by an
alarm clock. During the day caffeine, the world’s most popular drug, helps to keep us awake. 75% of the
world’s population habitually consume caffeine, which up to a point masks the symptoms of sleep
deprivation.
What does a chronic lack of sleep do to us? As well as making us irritable and unhappy as humans, it also
reduces our motivation and ability to work. This has serious implications for society in general. Doctors, for
example, are often chronically sleep deprived, especially when they are on ‘night call’, and may get less than
three hours’ sleep. Lack of sleep can seriously impair their mood, judgment, and ability to take decisions.
Tired engineers, in the early hours of the morning, made a series of mistakes with catastrophic results. On
our roads and motorways lack of sleep kills thousands of people every year. Tests show that a tired driver can
be just as dangerous as a drunken driver. However, driving when drunk is against the law but driving when
exhausted isn’t. As Paul Martin says, it is very ironic that we admire people who function on very little sleep
instead of criticizing them for being irresponsible. Our world would be a much safer, happier place if
everyone, whatever their job, slept eight hours a night.
  New English File Upper-intermediate by Clive Oxenden and Christina Latham-Koenig, OUP
Question 38: According to the third paragraph, which of the following statements is NOT TRUE?

A.

Our social life has no influence on our hours of sleep.

B.

The sun obviously determined our daily routines.

C.

The electric light was invented in the 19th century.

D.

The electric light has changed our daily cycle of sleep.

Câu 39

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate
the correct answer to each of the questions from 36 to 42.

We live in a world of tired, sleep deprived people. In his book Counting Sheep, Paul Martin – a behavioural
biologist – describes a society which is just too busy to sleep and which does not give sleeping the
importance it deserves.
Modern society has invented reasons not to sleep. We are now a 24/7 society where shops and services
must be available all hours. We spend longer hours at work than we used to, and more time getting to work.
Mobile phones and email allow us to stay in touch round the clock and late-night TV and the Internet tempt
us away from our beds. When we need more time for work or pleasure, the easy solution is to sleep less. The
average adult sleeps only 6.2 hours a night during the week, whereas research shows that most people need
eight or even eight and a half hours’ sleep to feel at their best. Nowadays, many people have got used to
sleeping less than they need and they live in an almost permanent state of ‘sleep debt’.
Until the invention of the electric light in 1879 our daily cycle of sleep used to depend on the hours of
daylight. People would get up with the sun and go to bed at nightfall. But nowadays our hours of sleep are
mainly determined by our working hours (or our social life) and most people are woken up artificially by an
alarm clock. During the day caffeine, the world’s most popular drug, helps to keep us awake. 75% of the
world’s population habitually consume caffeine, which up to a point masks the symptoms of sleep
deprivation.
What does a chronic lack of sleep do to us? As well as making us irritable and unhappy as humans, it also
reduces our motivation and ability to work. This has serious implications for society in general. Doctors, for
example, are often chronically sleep deprived, especially when they are on ‘night call’, and may get less than
three hours’ sleep. Lack of sleep can seriously impair their mood, judgment, and ability to take decisions.
Tired engineers, in the early hours of the morning, made a series of mistakes with catastrophic results. On
our roads and motorways lack of sleep kills thousands of people every year. Tests show that a tired driver can
be just as dangerous as a drunken driver. However, driving when drunk is against the law but driving when
exhausted isn’t. As Paul Martin says, it is very ironic that we admire people who function on very little sleep
instead of criticizing them for being irresponsible. Our world would be a much safer, happier place if
everyone, whatever their job, slept eight hours a night.
  New English File Upper-intermediate by Clive Oxenden and Christina Latham-Koenig, OUP
Question 39: The word “which” in the third paragraph refers to______.

A.

reaching a point

B.

masking the symptoms

C.

the world’s population

D.

caffeine consumption

Câu 40

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate
the correct answer to each of the questions from 36 to 42.

We live in a world of tired, sleep deprived people. In his book Counting Sheep, Paul Martin – a behavioural
biologist – describes a society which is just too busy to sleep and which does not give sleeping the
importance it deserves.
Modern society has invented reasons not to sleep. We are now a 24/7 society where shops and services
must be available all hours. We spend longer hours at work than we used to, and more time getting to work.
Mobile phones and email allow us to stay in touch round the clock and late-night TV and the Internet tempt
us away from our beds. When we need more time for work or pleasure, the easy solution is to sleep less. The
average adult sleeps only 6.2 hours a night during the week, whereas research shows that most people need
eight or even eight and a half hours’ sleep to feel at their best. Nowadays, many people have got used to
sleeping less than they need and they live in an almost permanent state of ‘sleep debt’.
Until the invention of the electric light in 1879 our daily cycle of sleep used to depend on the hours of
daylight. People would get up with the sun and go to bed at nightfall. But nowadays our hours of sleep are
mainly determined by our working hours (or our social life) and most people are woken up artificially by an
alarm clock. During the day caffeine, the world’s most popular drug, helps to keep us awake. 75% of the
world’s population habitually consume caffeine, which up to a point masks the symptoms of sleep
deprivation.
What does a chronic lack of sleep do to us? As well as making us irritable and unhappy as humans, it also
reduces our motivation and ability to work. This has serious implications for society in general. Doctors, for
example, are often chronically sleep deprived, especially when they are on ‘night call’, and may get less than
three hours’ sleep. Lack of sleep can seriously impair their mood, judgment, and ability to take decisions.
Tired engineers, in the early hours of the morning, made a series of mistakes with catastrophic results. On
our roads and motorways lack of sleep kills thousands of people every year. Tests show that a tired driver can
be just as dangerous as a drunken driver. However, driving when drunk is against the law but driving when
exhausted isn’t. As Paul Martin says, it is very ironic that we admire people who function on very little sleep
instead of criticizing them for being irresponsible. Our world would be a much safer, happier place if
everyone, whatever their job, slept eight hours a night.
  New English File Upper-intermediate by Clive Oxenden and Christina Latham-Koenig, OUP
Question 40: Which of the following would the writer of the passage approve of?

A.

Our world would be a much safer place without drinkers.

B.

Both drunken drivers and sleep-deprived people should be criticized.

C.

There is no point in criticizing irresponsible people in our society.

D.

We certainly can function well even when we hardly sleep.

Câu 41

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate
the correct answer to each of the questions from 36 to 42.

We live in a world of tired, sleep deprived people. In his book Counting Sheep, Paul Martin – a behavioural
biologist – describes a society which is just too busy to sleep and which does not give sleeping the
importance it deserves.
Modern society has invented reasons not to sleep. We are now a 24/7 society where shops and services
must be available all hours. We spend longer hours at work than we used to, and more time getting to work.
Mobile phones and email allow us to stay in touch round the clock and late-night TV and the Internet tempt
us away from our beds. When we need more time for work or pleasure, the easy solution is to sleep less. The
average adult sleeps only 6.2 hours a night during the week, whereas research shows that most people need
eight or even eight and a half hours’ sleep to feel at their best. Nowadays, many people have got used to
sleeping less than they need and they live in an almost permanent state of ‘sleep debt’.
Until the invention of the electric light in 1879 our daily cycle of sleep used to depend on the hours of
daylight. People would get up with the sun and go to bed at nightfall. But nowadays our hours of sleep are
mainly determined by our working hours (or our social life) and most people are woken up artificially by an
alarm clock. During the day caffeine, the world’s most popular drug, helps to keep us awake. 75% of the
world’s population habitually consume caffeine, which up to a point masks the symptoms of sleep
deprivation.
What does a chronic lack of sleep do to us? As well as making us irritable and unhappy as humans, it also
reduces our motivation and ability to work. This has serious implications for society in general. Doctors, for
example, are often chronically sleep deprived, especially when they are on ‘night call’, and may get less than
three hours’ sleep. Lack of sleep can seriously impair their mood, judgment, and ability to take decisions.
Tired engineers, in the early hours of the morning, made a series of mistakes with catastrophic results. On
our roads and motorways lack of sleep kills thousands of people every year. Tests show that a tired driver can
be just as dangerous as a drunken driver. However, driving when drunk is against the law but driving when
exhausted isn’t. As Paul Martin says, it is very ironic that we admire people who function on very little sleep
instead of criticizing them for being irresponsible. Our world would be a much safer, happier place if
everyone, whatever their job, slept eight hours a night.
  New English File Upper-intermediate by Clive Oxenden and Christina Latham-Koenig, OUP
Question 41: All of the following are mentioned as those whose performance is affected by
‘sleep debt’ EXCEPT_____.

A.

doctors

B.

drivers

C.

biologists

D.

engineers

Câu 42

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate
the correct answer to each of the questions from 36 to 42.

We live in a world of tired, sleep deprived people. In his book Counting Sheep, Paul Martin – a behavioural
biologist – describes a society which is just too busy to sleep and which does not give sleeping the
importance it deserves.
Modern society has invented reasons not to sleep. We are now a 24/7 society where shops and services
must be available all hours. We spend longer hours at work than we used to, and more time getting to work.
Mobile phones and email allow us to stay in touch round the clock and late-night TV and the Internet tempt
us away from our beds. When we need more time for work or pleasure, the easy solution is to sleep less. The
average adult sleeps only 6.2 hours a night during the week, whereas research shows that most people need
eight or even eight and a half hours’ sleep to feel at their best. Nowadays, many people have got used to
sleeping less than they need and they live in an almost permanent state of ‘sleep debt’.
Until the invention of the electric light in 1879 our daily cycle of sleep used to depend on the hours of
daylight. People would get up with the sun and go to bed at nightfall. But nowadays our hours of sleep are
mainly determined by our working hours (or our social life) and most people are woken up artificially by an
alarm clock. During the day caffeine, the world’s most popular drug, helps to keep us awake. 75% of the
world’s population habitually consume caffeine, which up to a point masks the symptoms of sleep
deprivation.
What does a chronic lack of sleep do to us? As well as making us irritable and unhappy as humans, it also
reduces our motivation and ability to work. This has serious implications for society in general. Doctors, for
example, are often chronically sleep deprived, especially when they are on ‘night call’, and may get less than
three hours’ sleep. Lack of sleep can seriously impair their mood, judgment, and ability to take decisions.
Tired engineers, in the early hours of the morning, made a series of mistakes with catastrophic results. On
our roads and motorways lack of sleep kills thousands of people every year. Tests show that a tired driver can
be just as dangerous as a drunken driver. However, driving when drunk is against the law but driving when
exhausted isn’t. As Paul Martin says, it is very ironic that we admire people who function on very little sleep
instead of criticizing them for being irresponsible. Our world would be a much safer, happier place if
everyone, whatever their job, slept eight hours a night.
  New English File Upper-intermediate by Clive Oxenden and Christina Latham-Koenig, OUP
Question 42: Which of the following could best serve as the title of the passage?

A.

Accident Prevention: Urgent!

B.

Sleep Deprivation: Causes and Effects

C.

A Society of Sleepless People

D.

A Well-known Biologist

Câu 43

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to choose the
best answer for each of the question from 43- 50

American movies create myths about college life in the United States. These stories are entertaining, but
they are not true. You have to look beyond Hollywood movies to understand what college is really like.
Thanks to the movies, many people believe that college students party and socialize more than they study.
Movies almost never show students working hard in class or in the library. Instead, movies show them eating,
talking, hanging out, or dancing to loud music at wild parties. While it is true that American students have the
freedom to participate in activities, they also have academic responsibilities. In order to succeed, they
have to attend classes and study hard.
Another movie myth is that athletics is the only important extracurricular activity. In fact, there is a wide
variety of nonacademic activities on campus such as special clubs, service organizations, art, and theater
programs. This variety allows students to choose what interests them. Even more important, after graduation,
students’ résumés look better to employers if they list a few extracurricular activities.
Most students in the movies can easily afford higher education. If only this were true! While it is true that
some American college students are wealthy, most are from families with moderate incomes. Up to 80% of
them get some type of financial aid. Students from middle and lower-income families often work part-time
throughout their college years. There is one thing that many college students have in common, but it is not
something you will see in the movies. They have parents who think higher education is a priority, a necessary
and important part of their children's lives.
Movies about college life usually have characters that are extreme in some way: super athletic, super
intelligent, super wealthy, super glamorous, etc. Movies use these stereotypes, along with other myths of
romance and adventure because audiences like going to movies that include these elements. Of course, real
college students are not like movie characters at all.
So the next time you want a taste of the college experience, do not go to the movies. Look at some
college websites or brochures instead. Take a walk around your local college campus. Visit a few classes.
True, you may not be able to see the same people or exciting action you will see in the movies, but you can
be sure that there are plenty of academic adventures going on all around you!
Question 43. Which of the following is true according to the passage?

A.

American students do not like to watch Hollywood movies.

B.

You should see college movies to understand college life.

C.

American colleges in the movies are not like those in reality.

D.

Movies about college life are similar to life and fun to watch.

Câu 44

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to choose the
best answer for each of the question from 43- 50

American movies create myths about college life in the United States. These stories are entertaining, but
they are not true. You have to look beyond Hollywood movies to understand what college is really like.
Thanks to the movies, many people believe that college students party and socialize more than they study.
Movies almost never show students working hard in class or in the library. Instead, movies show them eating,
talking, hanging out, or dancing to loud music at wild parties. While it is true that American students have the
freedom to participate in activities, they also have academic responsibilities. In order to succeed, they
have to attend classes and study hard.
Another movie myth is that athletics is the only important extracurricular activity. In fact, there is a wide
variety of nonacademic activities on campus such as special clubs, service organizations, art, and theater
programs. This variety allows students to choose what interests them. Even more important, after graduation,
students’ résumés look better to employers if they list a few extracurricular activities.
Most students in the movies can easily afford higher education. If only this were true! While it is true that
some American college students are wealthy, most are from families with moderate incomes. Up to 80% of
them get some type of financial aid. Students from middle and lower-income families often work part-time
throughout their college years. There is one thing that many college students have in common, but it is not
something you will see in the movies. They have parents who think higher education is a priority, a necessary
and important part of their children's lives.
Movies about college life usually have characters that are extreme in some way: super athletic, super
intelligent, super wealthy, super glamorous, etc. Movies use these stereotypes, along with other myths of
romance and adventure because audiences like going to movies that include these elements. Of course, real
college students are not like movie characters at all.
So the next time you want a taste of the college experience, do not go to the movies. Look at some
college websites or brochures instead. Take a walk around your local college campus. Visit a few classes.
True, you may not be able to see the same people or exciting action you will see in the movies, but you can
be sure that there are plenty of academic adventures going on all around you!
Question 44. Which of the following is NOT true?

A.

There is a wide choice of extracurricular activities for college students.

B.

Extracurricular activities are of no importance to employers.

C.

Not all extracurricular activities are students’ academic responsibilities.

D.

Learning is not only part of students’ college life.

Câu 45

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to choose the
best answer for each of the question from 43- 50

American movies create myths about college life in the United States. These stories are entertaining, but
they are not true. You have to look beyond Hollywood movies to understand what college is really like.
Thanks to the movies, many people believe that college students party and socialize more than they study.
Movies almost never show students working hard in class or in the library. Instead, movies show them eating,
talking, hanging out, or dancing to loud music at wild parties. While it is true that American students have the
freedom to participate in activities, they also have academic responsibilities. In order to succeed, they
have to attend classes and study hard.
Another movie myth is that athletics is the only important extracurricular activity. In fact, there is a wide
variety of nonacademic activities on campus such as special clubs, service organizations, art, and theater
programs. This variety allows students to choose what interests them. Even more important, after graduation,
students’ résumés look better to employers if they list a few extracurricular activities.
Most students in the movies can easily afford higher education. If only this were true! While it is true that
some American college students are wealthy, most are from families with moderate incomes. Up to 80% of
them get some type of financial aid. Students from middle and lower-income families often work part-time
throughout their college years. There is one thing that many college students have in common, but it is not
something you will see in the movies. They have parents who think higher education is a priority, a necessary
and important part of their children's lives.
Movies about college life usually have characters that are extreme in some way: super athletic, super
intelligent, super wealthy, super glamorous, etc. Movies use these stereotypes, along with other myths of
romance and adventure because audiences like going to movies that include these elements. Of course, real
college students are not like movie characters at all.
So the next time you want a taste of the college experience, do not go to the movies. Look at some
college websites or brochures instead. Take a walk around your local college campus. Visit a few classes.
True, you may not be able to see the same people or exciting action you will see in the movies, but you can
be sure that there are plenty of academic adventures going on all around you!
Question 45. The word “they” in the third paragraph refers to ______.

A.

activities

B.

résumés

C.

employers

D.

students

Câu 46

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to choose the
best answer for each of the question from 43- 50

American movies create myths about college life in the United States. These stories are entertaining, but
they are not true. You have to look beyond Hollywood movies to understand what college is really like.
Thanks to the movies, many people believe that college students party and socialize more than they study.
Movies almost never show students working hard in class or in the library. Instead, movies show them eating,
talking, hanging out, or dancing to loud music at wild parties. While it is true that American students have the
freedom to participate in activities, they also have academic responsibilities. In order to succeed, they
have to attend classes and study hard.
Another movie myth is that athletics is the only important extracurricular activity. In fact, there is a wide
variety of nonacademic activities on campus such as special clubs, service organizations, art, and theater
programs. This variety allows students to choose what interests them. Even more important, after graduation,
students’ résumés look better to employers if they list a few extracurricular activities.
Most students in the movies can easily afford higher education. If only this were true! While it is true that
some American college students are wealthy, most are from families with moderate incomes. Up to 80% of
them get some type of financial aid. Students from middle and lower-income families often work part-time
throughout their college years. There is one thing that many college students have in common, but it is not
something you will see in the movies. They have parents who think higher education is a priority, a necessary
and important part of their children's lives.
Movies about college life usually have characters that are extreme in some way: super athletic, super
intelligent, super wealthy, super glamorous, etc. Movies use these stereotypes, along with other myths of
romance and adventure because audiences like going to movies that include these elements. Of course, real
college students are not like movie characters at all.
So the next time you want a taste of the college experience, do not go to the movies. Look at some
college websites or brochures instead. Take a walk around your local college campus. Visit a few classes.
True, you may not be able to see the same people or exciting action you will see in the movies, but you can
be sure that there are plenty of academic adventures going on all around you!
Question 46. The word “moderate” in the fourth paragraph is closest in meaning to “______”.

A.

not steady

B.

sensible

C.

unlimited

D.

not high

Câu 47

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to choose the
best answer for each of the question from 43- 50

American movies create myths about college life in the United States. These stories are entertaining, but
they are not true. You have to look beyond Hollywood movies to understand what college is really like.
Thanks to the movies, many people believe that college students party and socialize more than they study.
Movies almost never show students working hard in class or in the library. Instead, movies show them eating,
talking, hanging out, or dancing to loud music at wild parties. While it is true that American students have the
freedom to participate in activities, they also have academic responsibilities. In order to succeed, they
have to attend classes and study hard.
Another movie myth is that athletics is the only important extracurricular activity. In fact, there is a wide
variety of nonacademic activities on campus such as special clubs, service organizations, art, and theater
programs. This variety allows students to choose what interests them. Even more important, after graduation,
students’ résumés look better to employers if they list a few extracurricular activities.
Most students in the movies can easily afford higher education. If only this were true! While it is true that
some American college students are wealthy, most are from families with moderate incomes. Up to 80% of
them get some type of financial aid. Students from middle and lower-income families often work part-time
throughout their college years. There is one thing that many college students have in common, but it is not
something you will see in the movies. They have parents who think higher education is a priority, a necessary
and important part of their children's lives.
Movies about college life usually have characters that are extreme in some way: super athletic, super
intelligent, super wealthy, super glamorous, etc. Movies use these stereotypes, along with other myths of
romance and adventure because audiences like going to movies that include these elements. Of course, real
college students are not like movie characters at all.
So the next time you want a taste of the college experience, do not go to the movies. Look at some
college websites or brochures instead. Take a walk around your local college campus. Visit a few classes.
True, you may not be able to see the same people or exciting action you will see in the movies, but you can
be sure that there are plenty of academic adventures going on all around you!
Question 47. Which of the following is NOT mentioned in the passage?

A.

Most college students’ families are not well-off.

B.

All college students have to work part-time.

C.

It is important for students to get higher education.

D.

Most students in the movies can afford college expenses.

Câu 48

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to choose the
best answer for each of the question from 43- 50

American movies create myths about college life in the United States. These stories are entertaining, but
they are not true. You have to look beyond Hollywood movies to understand what college is really like.
Thanks to the movies, many people believe that college students party and socialize more than they study.
Movies almost never show students working hard in class or in the library. Instead, movies show them eating,
talking, hanging out, or dancing to loud music at wild parties. While it is true that American students have the
freedom to participate in activities, they also have academic responsibilities. In order to succeed, they
have to attend classes and study hard.
Another movie myth is that athletics is the only important extracurricular activity. In fact, there is a wide
variety of nonacademic activities on campus such as special clubs, service organizations, art, and theater
programs. This variety allows students to choose what interests them. Even more important, after graduation,
students’ résumés look better to employers if they list a few extracurricular activities.
Most students in the movies can easily afford higher education. If only this were true! While it is true that
some American college students are wealthy, most are from families with moderate incomes. Up to 80% of
them get some type of financial aid. Students from middle and lower-income families often work part-time
throughout their college years. There is one thing that many college students have in common, but it is not
something you will see in the movies. They have parents who think higher education is a priority, a necessary
and important part of their children's lives.
Movies about college life usually have characters that are extreme in some way: super athletic, super
intelligent, super wealthy, super glamorous, etc. Movies use these stereotypes, along with other myths of
romance and adventure because audiences like going to movies that include these elements. Of course, real
college students are not like movie characters at all.
So the next time you want a taste of the college experience, do not go to the movies. Look at some
college websites or brochures instead. Take a walk around your local college campus. Visit a few classes.
True, you may not be able to see the same people or exciting action you will see in the movies, but you can
be sure that there are plenty of academic adventures going on all around you!
Question 48. American parents believe in ______.

A.

the necessity of higher education in their children's lives

B.

the quality of their children's college lives

C.

the extracurricular activities that help ensure their children’s jobs

D.

how movie-makers describe American college life

Câu 49

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to choose the
best answer for each of the question from 43- 50

American movies create myths about college life in the United States. These stories are entertaining, but
they are not true. You have to look beyond Hollywood movies to understand what college is really like.
Thanks to the movies, many people believe that college students party and socialize more than they study.
Movies almost never show students working hard in class or in the library. Instead, movies show them eating,
talking, hanging out, or dancing to loud music at wild parties. While it is true that American students have the
freedom to participate in activities, they also have academic responsibilities. In order to succeed, they
have to attend classes and study hard.
Another movie myth is that athletics is the only important extracurricular activity. In fact, there is a wide
variety of nonacademic activities on campus such as special clubs, service organizations, art, and theater
programs. This variety allows students to choose what interests them. Even more important, after graduation,
students’ résumés look better to employers if they list a few extracurricular activities.
Most students in the movies can easily afford higher education. If only this were true! While it is true that
some American college students are wealthy, most are from families with moderate incomes. Up to 80% of
them get some type of financial aid. Students from middle and lower-income families often work part-time
throughout their college years. There is one thing that many college students have in common, but it is not
something you will see in the movies. They have parents who think higher education is a priority, a necessary
and important part of their children's lives.
Movies about college life usually have characters that are extreme in some way: super athletic, super
intelligent, super wealthy, super glamorous, etc. Movies use these stereotypes, along with other myths of
romance and adventure because audiences like going to movies that include these elements. Of course, real
college students are not like movie characters at all.
So the next time you want a taste of the college experience, do not go to the movies. Look at some
college websites or brochures instead. Take a walk around your local college campus. Visit a few classes.
True, you may not be able to see the same people or exciting action you will see in the movies, but you can
be sure that there are plenty of academic adventures going on all around you!
Question 49. Many American students have to work part-time throughout their college years
because ______.

A.

they are not allowed to work full-time

B.

their parents force them to

C.

they can earn money for their expenses

D.

they want to gain experience

Câu 50

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to choose the
best answer for each of the question from 43- 50

American movies create myths about college life in the United States. These stories are entertaining, but
they are not true. You have to look beyond Hollywood movies to understand what college is really like.
Thanks to the movies, many people believe that college students party and socialize more than they study.
Movies almost never show students working hard in class or in the library. Instead, movies show them eating,
talking, hanging out, or dancing to loud music at wild parties. While it is true that American students have the
freedom to participate in activities, they also have academic responsibilities. In order to succeed, they
have to attend classes and study hard.
Another movie myth is that athletics is the only important extracurricular activity. In fact, there is a wide
variety of nonacademic activities on campus such as special clubs, service organizations, art, and theater
programs. This variety allows students to choose what interests them. Even more important, after graduation,
students’ résumés look better to employers if they list a few extracurricular activities.
Most students in the movies can easily afford higher education. If only this were true! While it is true that
some American college students are wealthy, most are from families with moderate incomes. Up to 80% of
them get some type of financial aid. Students from middle and lower-income families often work part-time
throughout their college years. There is one thing that many college students have in common, but it is not
something you will see in the movies. They have parents who think higher education is a priority, a necessary
and important part of their children's lives.
Movies about college life usually have characters that are extreme in some way: super athletic, super
intelligent, super wealthy, super glamorous, etc. Movies use these stereotypes, along with other myths of
romance and adventure because audiences like going to movies that include these elements. Of course, real
college students are not like movie characters at all.
So the next time you want a taste of the college experience, do not go to the movies. Look at some
college websites or brochures instead. Take a walk around your local college campus. Visit a few classes.
True, you may not be able to see the same people or exciting action you will see in the movies, but you can
be sure that there are plenty of academic adventures going on all around you!
Question 50. Which of the following could best serve as the title of the passage?

A.

Extracurricular Activities and Job Opportunities

B.

American College Life and the Movies

C.

Hollywood Movies: The Best About College Life

D.

Going to College: The Only Way to Succeed in Life

 

Top điểm cao trong 7 ngày qua

Đề thi trắc nghiệm mới

Tài liệu mới trên Matran.vn

Công cụ trực tuyến hỗ trợ giáo dục - MaTran.edu.vn
Copyright © 2014-2021. All rights reserved. Bản quyền thuộc VinaGon
Email: info@vinagon.com
Hotline: 086.924.3838
• Liên hệ hỗ trợ
• Quy định chung
• Chính sách bảo mật
• Phương thức thanh toán