Đề thi THPTQG Trường THPT Ngô Thì Nhậm Hà Nội Môn: Tiếng Anh Năm 2020

; Môn học: ; 50 câu hỏi; Làm trong 60 phút; cập nhật 07-04-2020

  • Câu hỏi 1:

    Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the word whose underlined part differs from the other three in
    pronunciation in each of the following questions.
    Question 1.

    A.

    off

    B.

    of

    C.

    safe

    D.

    knife

  • Câu hỏi 2:

    Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the word whose underlined part differs from the other three in
    pronunciation in each of the following questions.
    Question 2.

    A.

    sacred

    B.

    decided

    C.

    cooked

    D.

    contaminated

  • Câu hỏi 3:

    Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the word that differs from the other three in the position of
    primary stress in each of the following questions.
    Question 3.

    A.

    humanitarian

    B.

    durability

    C.

    individual

    D.

    economical

  • Câu hỏi 4:

    Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the word that differs from the other three in the position of
    primary stress in each of the following questions.
    Question 4.

    A.

    achievement

    B.

    machinery

    C.

    apparent

    D.

    interfere

  • Câu hỏi 5:

    Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the underlined part that needs correction in each of the following
    questions.
    Question 5.
    Often the bottom of a pan or skillet becomes black when it is placed among a fire .

    A.

    of a pan

    B.

    becomes black

    C.

    among

    D.

    a fire

  • Câu hỏi 6:

    Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the underlined part that needs correction in each of the following
    questions.
    Question 6.
    My grandfather had been looking for his newspaper for almost half an hour until finally he found
    it
    lying on his bed.

    A.

    for

    B.

    until

    C.

    finally he found it

    D.

    lying

  • Câu hỏi 7:

    Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the underlined part that needs correction in each of the following
    questions.
    Question 7.
    Farm animals have been regardless by nearly all societies as a valuable economic resource

    A.

    animals

    B.

    regardless

    C.

    valuable

    D.

    resource

  • Câu hỏi 8:

    Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
    following questions.
    Question 8.
    Neither Tom nor his brothers ______ willing to help their mother with the housework.

    A.

    are

    B.

    was

    C.

    is

    D.

    has been

  • Câu hỏi 9:

    Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
    following questions.
    Question 9.
    “Never say that again, _______?”

    A.

    won’t you

    B.

    do you

    C.

    don’t you

    D.

    will you

  • Câu hỏi 10:

    Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
    following questions.
    Question 10.
    Do you know the person _______ next to you in the evening class?

    A.

    whose sitting

    B.

    whom sits

    C.

    sitting

    D.

    who sit

  • Câu hỏi 11:

    Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
    following questions.
    Question 11.
    Tony Blair is believed ________ for Liverpool last week.

    A.

    having left

    B.

    to have left

    C.

    to leave

    D.

    leaving

  • Câu hỏi 12:

    Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
    following questions.
    Question 12.
    Not until a monkey is several years old _______ to exhibit sign of independence from its mother.

    A.

    it begins

    B.

    does it begin

    C.

    and begin

    D.

    is it begin

  • Câu hỏi 13:

    Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
    following questions.
    Question 13
    . _______ is increasing, which results from economic crisis.

    A.

    Employment

    B.

    Unemployed

    C.

    Unemployment

    D.

    Employ

  • Câu hỏi 14:

    Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
    following questions.
    Question 14.
    Dogs make very _______ pets. They’ll always stay by your side

    A.

    loyal

    B.

    private

    C.

    mental

    D.

    digital

  • Câu hỏi 15:

    Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
    following questions.
    Question 15.
    House prices ________ greatly from one area to the next.

    A.

    contrast

    B.

    vary

    C.

    distinguish

    D.

    differentiate

  • Câu hỏi 16:

    Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
    following questions.
    Question 16.
    I can’t _______ of a word he is saying.

    A.

    make sense

    B.

    grasp

    C.

    comprehend

    D.

    understand

  • Câu hỏi 17:

    Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
    following questions.
    Question 17.
    The number of people traveling by air has been growing _______.

    A.

    by leaps and bounds

    B.

    from time to time

    C.

    slow but sure

    D.

    by hook or by crook

  • Câu hỏi 18:

    Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
    following questions.
    Question 18.
    The boss told the workers that he would try his best to continue running the company and
    promised not to _______ any employees during the economic recession.

    A.

    cross out

    B.

    shut down

    C.

    lay off

    D.

    take over

  • Câu hỏi 19:

    Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the
    following questions.
    Question 19.
    After her illness, Lam had to work hard to _______ his classmates

    A.

    catch sight of

    B.

    keep pace with

    C.

    get in touch with

    D.

    make allowance for

  • Câu hỏi 20:

    Mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to indicate the most suitable response to
    complete each of the following exchanges.
    Question 20.
    Jane: "It's going to rain."
                           Mary: "___________"

    A.

    I hope not so

    B.

    I don't hope either 

    C.

    I don't hope so

    D.

    I hope not

  • Câu hỏi 21:

    Mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to indicate the most suitable response to
    complete each of the following exchanges.
    Question 21.
    "Our team has just won the last football match." - "______"

    A.

    Good idea. Thanks for the news

    B.

    Yes. I guess it's very good

    C.

    Well, that's very surprising!

    D.

    Yes, it's our pleasure

  • Câu hỏi 22:

    Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the word(s) CLOSEST in meaning to the underlined word(s) in
    the following questions.
    Question 22.
    The whole village was wiped out in the bombing raids.

    A.

    changed completely

    B.

    cleaned well

    C.

    destroyed completely

    D.

    removed quickly

  • Câu hỏi 23:

    Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the word(s) CLOSEST in meaning to the underlined word(s) in
    the following questions.
    Question 23.
    Roget’s Thesaurus, a collection of English words and phrases, was originally arranged by the
    ideas they express rather than by alphabetical order

    A.

    as well as

    B.

    instead of

    C.

    restricted

    D.

    unless

  • Câu hỏi 24:

    Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the word(s) OPPOSITE in meaning to the underlined word(s) in
    each of the following questions.
    Question 24.
    Dr. Jones suggested that final examinations should be discontinued, an innovation I heartily
    support.

    A.

    deleted

    B.

    kept

    C.

    terminated

    D.

    changed

  • Câu hỏi 25:

    Choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the word(s) OPPOSITE in meaning to the underlined word(s) in
    each of the following questions.
    Question 25.
    He luckily inherited a lucrative business from his father

    A.

    loss- making

    B.

    losing

    C.

    Wealthy

    D.

    profitable

  • Câu hỏi 26:

    Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the sentence that is closest in
    meaning to each of the following questions.
    Question 26. “What are you going to do with such a long list of books, Dane?” asked Sarah

    A.

    Sarah was curious why Dane had such a long list of books

    B.

    Sarah asked Dane what he was going to do with such a long list of books

    C.

    Sarah could not understand why Dane was borrowing such a long list of books

    D.

    Sarah warned Dane not to borrow such a long list of books

  • Câu hỏi 27:

    Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the sentence that is closest in
    meaning to each of the following questions.
    Question 27. When I picked up my book I found that the cover had been torn

    A.

    Picking up my book, the cover had been torn

    B.

    On picking up the book, I saw that the cover had been torn

    C.

    Picked up, I saw that the cover of the book was torn

    D.

    The cover had been torn when my book picked up

  • Câu hỏi 28:

    Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the sentence that is closest in
    meaning to each of the following questions.
    Question 28. The Internet has enabled most people to get contact in a matter of moments.

    A.

    Most people have been able to get in contact by the Internet in a matter of moments.

    B.

    Most people have got in contact as enabled in a matter of moments by the Internet

    C.

    On the Internet, most people are able to get in contact in a matter of moments

    D.

    On the Internet, most people can find their contacts in a matter of moments.

  • Câu hỏi 29:

    Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the sentence that best combines
    each pair of sentences in the following questions.
    Question 29. The teacher has done his best to help all students. However, none of them made
    any effort on their part.

    A.

    The teacher has done his best to help all students, then, none of them made any effort on their part

    B.

    Although the teacher has done his best to help all students, none of them made any effort on their part

    C.

    Because the teacher has done his best to help all students, none of them made any effort on their part

    D.

    If the teacher has done his best to help all students, none of them made any effort on their part

  • Câu hỏi 30:

    Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the sentence that best combines
    each pair of sentences in the following questions.
    Question 30. “Finish your work. And then you can go home.”

    A.

    “You can’t go home until you finish your work.”

    B.

    “You finish your work to go home as early as you can.”

    C.

    “When you go home, finish your work then.”

    D.

    “Because you have finished your work, you can go home.”

  • Câu hỏi 31:

    Read the following passage and choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the correct word or phrase that
    best fits each of the following blanks.

    Bonfire Night is (31)______ all over Britain on November 5th. The festival dates from 1605 when a man called
    Guy Fawkes tried to blow up the Houses of Parliament. He was caught and hanged, (32)______ the other
    conspirators.
    Preparations for Bonfire Night usually start weeks before the event itself .Children go from house to house
    (33)_______ old furniture, newspapers and anything else which will burn for their bonfires. They make a
    “guy”, a figure which (34)______ Guy Fawkes, from an old sack and wheel it round the streets asking for
    money which they use to buy fireworks.
    On the day itself, as soon as it is dark, the guy is put on top of bonfire, which is then lit. Fireworks are set off
    and everyone enjoys the display as they stand round the fire (35)______ warm and eating baked potatoes
    and hot dogs.
    Question 31.

    A.

    celebrated

    B.

    opened

    C.

    organizing

    D.

    held

  • Câu hỏi 32:

    Read the following passage and choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the correct word or phrase that
    best fits each of the following blanks.

    Bonfire Night is (31)______ all over Britain on November 5th. The festival dates from 1605 when a man called
    Guy Fawkes tried to blow up the Houses of Parliament. He was caught and hanged, (32)______ the other
    conspirators.
    Preparations for Bonfire Night usually start weeks before the event itself .Children go from house to house
    (33)_______ old furniture, newspapers and anything else which will burn for their bonfires. They make a
    “guy”, a figure which (34)______ Guy Fawkes, from an old sack and wheel it round the streets asking for
    money which they use to buy fireworks.
    On the day itself, as soon as it is dark, the guy is put on top of bonfire, which is then lit. Fireworks are set off
    and everyone enjoys the display as they stand round the fire (35)______ warm and eating baked potatoes
    and hot dogs.
    Question 32.

    A.

    related to

    B.

    together

    C.

    associated with

    D.

    along with

  • Câu hỏi 33:

    Read the following passage and choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the correct word or phrase that
    best fits each of the following blanks.

    Bonfire Night is (31)______ all over Britain on November 5th. The festival dates from 1605 when a man called
    Guy Fawkes tried to blow up the Houses of Parliament. He was caught and hanged, (32)______ the other
    conspirators.
    Preparations for Bonfire Night usually start weeks before the event itself .Children go from house to house
    (33)_______ old furniture, newspapers and anything else which will burn for their bonfires. They make a
    “guy”, a figure which (34)______ Guy Fawkes, from an old sack and wheel it round the streets asking for
    money which they use to buy fireworks.
    On the day itself, as soon as it is dark, the guy is put on top of bonfire, which is then lit. Fireworks are set off
    and everyone enjoys the display as they stand round the fire (35)______ warm and eating baked potatoes
    and hot dogs.
    Question 33.

    A.

    gathered

    B.

    collecting

    C.

    bringing

    D.

    carrying

  • Câu hỏi 34:

    Read the following passage and choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the correct word or phrase that
    best fits each of the following blanks.

    Bonfire Night is (31)______ all over Britain on November 5th. The festival dates from 1605 when a man called
    Guy Fawkes tried to blow up the Houses of Parliament. He was caught and hanged, (32)______ the other
    conspirators.
    Preparations for Bonfire Night usually start weeks before the event itself .Children go from house to house
    (33)_______ old furniture, newspapers and anything else which will burn for their bonfires. They make a
    “guy”, a figure which (34)______ Guy Fawkes, from an old sack and wheel it round the streets asking for
    money which they use to buy fireworks.
    On the day itself, as soon as it is dark, the guy is put on top of bonfire, which is then lit. Fireworks are set off
    and everyone enjoys the display as they stand round the fire (35)______ warm and eating baked potatoes
    and hot dogs.
    Question 34.

    A.

    symbolizes

    B.

    signals

    C.

    represents

    D.

    resembles

  • Câu hỏi 35:

    Read the following passage and choose A, B, C, or D to indicate the correct word or phrase that
    best fits each of the following blanks.

    Bonfire Night is (31)______ all over Britain on November 5th. The festival dates from 1605 when a man called
    Guy Fawkes tried to blow up the Houses of Parliament. He was caught and hanged, (32)______ the other
    conspirators.
    Preparations for Bonfire Night usually start weeks before the event itself .Children go from house to house
    (33)_______ old furniture, newspapers and anything else which will burn for their bonfires. They make a
    “guy”, a figure which (34)______ Guy Fawkes, from an old sack and wheel it round the streets asking for
    money which they use to buy fireworks.
    On the day itself, as soon as it is dark, the guy is put on top of bonfire, which is then lit. Fireworks are set off
    and everyone enjoys the display as they stand round the fire (35)______ warm and eating baked potatoes
    and hot dogs.
    Question 35.

    A.

    keeping

    B.

    remaining

    C.

    to stay

    D.

    to hold

  • Câu hỏi 36:

    Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate
    the correct answer to each of the questions from 36 to 42.

    Ranked as the number one beverage consumed worldwide, tea takes the lead over coffee in both popularity
    and production with more than 5 million tons of tea produced annually. Although much of this tea is
    consumed in Asian, European and African countries, the United States drinks its fair share. According to
    estimates by the Tea Council of the United States, tea is enjoyed by no less than half of the U.S. population
    on any given day. Black tea or green tea - iced, spiced, or instant - tea drinking has spurred a billion-dollar
    business with major tea producers in Africa and South America and throughout Asia.
    Tea is made from the leaves of an evergreen plant, Camellia sinensis, which grows tall and lush in tropical
    regions. On tea plantations, the plant is kept trimmed to approximately four feet high and as new buds called
    flush appear, they are plucked off by hand. Even in today’s world of modern agricultural machinery, hand
    harvesting continues to be the preferred method. Ideally, only the top two leaves and a bud should be
    picked. This new growth produces the highest quality tea.
    After being harvested, tea leaves are laid out on long drying racks, called withering racks, for 18 to 20 hours.
    Next, depending on the type of tea being produced, the leaves may be crushed or chopped to release flavor,
    and then fermented under controlled conditions of heat and humidity. For green tea, the whole leaves are
    often steamed to retain their green color, and the fermentation process is skipped. Producing black teas
    requires fermentation during which the tea leaves begin to darken. After fermentation, black tea is dried in
    vats to produce its rich brown or black color.
    No one knows when or how tea became popular, but legend has it that tea as a beverage, was discovered in
    2737 B.C. by Emperor Shen Nung of China when leaves from a Camellia dropped into his drinking water as it
    was boiling over a fire. As the story goes, Emperor Shen Nung drank the resulting liquid and proclaimed the
    drink to be most nourishing and refreshing. Though this account cannot be documented, it is thought that
    tea drinking probably originated in China and spread to other parts of Asia, then to Europe, and ultimately to
    America colonies around 1650.
    With about half the caffeine content as coffee, tea is often chosen by those who want to reduce, but not
    necessarily eliminate their caffeine intake. Some people find that tea is less acidic than coffee and therefore
    easier on the stomach. Others have become interested in tea drinking since the National Cancer Institute
    published its findings on the antioxidant properties of tea. But whether tea is enjoyed for its perceived health
    benefits, its flavor, or as a social drink, teacups continue to be filled daily with the world’s most popular
    beverage.
    Question 36: Why does the author include statistics on the amount of tea produced, sold and
    consumed?

    A.

    To show the expense of processing such a large quantity of tea.

    B.

    To explain why coffee is not the most popular beverage worldwide

    C.

    To demonstrate tea’s popularity.

    D.

    To impress the reader with factual sounding information.

  • Câu hỏi 37:

    Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate
    the correct answer to each of the questions from 36 to 42.

    Ranked as the number one beverage consumed worldwide, tea takes the lead over coffee in both popularity
    and production with more than 5 million tons of tea produced annually. Although much of this tea is
    consumed in Asian, European and African countries, the United States drinks its fair share. According to
    estimates by the Tea Council of the United States, tea is enjoyed by no less than half of the U.S. population
    on any given day. Black tea or green tea - iced, spiced, or instant - tea drinking has spurred a billion-dollar
    business with major tea producers in Africa and South America and throughout Asia.
    Tea is made from the leaves of an evergreen plant, Camellia sinensis, which grows tall and lush in tropical
    regions. On tea plantations, the plant is kept trimmed to approximately four feet high and as new buds called
    flush appear, they are plucked off by hand. Even in today’s world of modern agricultural machinery, hand
    harvesting continues to be the preferred method. Ideally, only the top two leaves and a bud should be
    picked. This new growth produces the highest quality tea.
    After being harvested, tea leaves are laid out on long drying racks, called withering racks, for 18 to 20 hours.
    Next, depending on the type of tea being produced, the leaves may be crushed or chopped to release flavor,
    and then fermented under controlled conditions of heat and humidity. For green tea, the whole leaves are
    often steamed to retain their green color, and the fermentation process is skipped. Producing black teas
    requires fermentation during which the tea leaves begin to darken. After fermentation, black tea is dried in
    vats to produce its rich brown or black color.
    No one knows when or how tea became popular, but legend has it that tea as a beverage, was discovered in
    2737 B.C. by Emperor Shen Nung of China when leaves from a Camellia dropped into his drinking water as it
    was boiling over a fire. As the story goes, Emperor Shen Nung drank the resulting liquid and proclaimed the
    drink to be most nourishing and refreshing. Though this account cannot be documented, it is thought that
    tea drinking probably originated in China and spread to other parts of Asia, then to Europe, and ultimately to
    America colonies around 1650.
    With about half the caffeine content as coffee, tea is often chosen by those who want to reduce, but not
    necessarily eliminate their caffeine intake. Some people find that tea is less acidic than coffee and therefore
    easier on the stomach. Others have become interested in tea drinking since the National Cancer Institute
    published its findings on the antioxidant properties of tea. But whether tea is enjoyed for its perceived health
    benefits, its flavor, or as a social drink, teacups continue to be filled daily with the world’s most popular
    beverage.
    Question 37: Based on the passage, what is implied about tea harvesting?

    A.

    It is totally done with the assistance of modern agricultural machinery

    B.

    It is no longer done in China

    C.

    The method has remained nearly the same for a long time

    D.

    The method involves trimming the uppermost branches of the plant

  • Câu hỏi 38:

    Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate
    the correct answer to each of the questions from 36 to 42.

    Ranked as the number one beverage consumed worldwide, tea takes the lead over coffee in both popularity
    and production with more than 5 million tons of tea produced annually. Although much of this tea is
    consumed in Asian, European and African countries, the United States drinks its fair share. According to
    estimates by the Tea Council of the United States, tea is enjoyed by no less than half of the U.S. population
    on any given day. Black tea or green tea - iced, spiced, or instant - tea drinking has spurred a billion-dollar
    business with major tea producers in Africa and South America and throughout Asia.
    Tea is made from the leaves of an evergreen plant, Camellia sinensis, which grows tall and lush in tropical
    regions. On tea plantations, the plant is kept trimmed to approximately four feet high and as new buds called
    flush appear, they are plucked off by hand. Even in today’s world of modern agricultural machinery, hand
    harvesting continues to be the preferred method. Ideally, only the top two leaves and a bud should be
    picked. This new growth produces the highest quality tea.
    After being harvested, tea leaves are laid out on long drying racks, called withering racks, for 18 to 20 hours.
    Next, depending on the type of tea being produced, the leaves may be crushed or chopped to release flavor,
    and then fermented under controlled conditions of heat and humidity. For green tea, the whole leaves are
    often steamed to retain their green color, and the fermentation process is skipped. Producing black teas
    requires fermentation during which the tea leaves begin to darken. After fermentation, black tea is dried in
    vats to produce its rich brown or black color.
    No one knows when or how tea became popular, but legend has it that tea as a beverage, was discovered in
    2737 B.C. by Emperor Shen Nung of China when leaves from a Camellia dropped into his drinking water as it
    was boiling over a fire. As the story goes, Emperor Shen Nung drank the resulting liquid and proclaimed the
    drink to be most nourishing and refreshing. Though this account cannot be documented, it is thought that
    tea drinking probably originated in China and spread to other parts of Asia, then to Europe, and ultimately to
    America colonies around 1650.
    With about half the caffeine content as coffee, tea is often chosen by those who want to reduce, but not
    necessarily eliminate their caffeine intake. Some people find that tea is less acidic than coffee and therefore
    easier on the stomach. Others have become interested in tea drinking since the National Cancer Institute
    published its findings on the antioxidant properties of tea. But whether tea is enjoyed for its perceived health
    benefits, its flavor, or as a social drink, teacups continue to be filled daily with the world’s most popular
    beverage.
    Question 38: What does the word “they” in paragraph 2 of the passage refer to?

    A.

    Tea pickers

    B.

    New buds

    C.

    Evergreen plants

    D.

    Tropical regions

  • Câu hỏi 39:

    Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate
    the correct answer to each of the questions from 36 to 42.

    Ranked as the number one beverage consumed worldwide, tea takes the lead over coffee in both popularity
    and production with more than 5 million tons of tea produced annually. Although much of this tea is
    consumed in Asian, European and African countries, the United States drinks its fair share. According to
    estimates by the Tea Council of the United States, tea is enjoyed by no less than half of the U.S. population
    on any given day. Black tea or green tea - iced, spiced, or instant - tea drinking has spurred a billion-dollar
    business with major tea producers in Africa and South America and throughout Asia.
    Tea is made from the leaves of an evergreen plant, Camellia sinensis, which grows tall and lush in tropical
    regions. On tea plantations, the plant is kept trimmed to approximately four feet high and as new buds called
    flush appear, they are plucked off by hand. Even in today’s world of modern agricultural machinery, hand
    harvesting continues to be the preferred method. Ideally, only the top two leaves and a bud should be
    picked. This new growth produces the highest quality tea.
    After being harvested, tea leaves are laid out on long drying racks, called withering racks, for 18 to 20 hours.
    Next, depending on the type of tea being produced, the leaves may be crushed or chopped to release flavor,
    and then fermented under controlled conditions of heat and humidity. For green tea, the whole leaves are
    often steamed to retain their green color, and the fermentation process is skipped. Producing black teas
    requires fermentation during which the tea leaves begin to darken. After fermentation, black tea is dried in
    vats to produce its rich brown or black color.
    No one knows when or how tea became popular, but legend has it that tea as a beverage, was discovered in
    2737 B.C. by Emperor Shen Nung of China when leaves from a Camellia dropped into his drinking water as it
    was boiling over a fire. As the story goes, Emperor Shen Nung drank the resulting liquid and proclaimed the
    drink to be most nourishing and refreshing. Though this account cannot be documented, it is thought that
    tea drinking probably originated in China and spread to other parts of Asia, then to Europe, and ultimately to
    America colonies around 1650.
    With about half the caffeine content as coffee, tea is often chosen by those who want to reduce, but not
    necessarily eliminate their caffeine intake. Some people find that tea is less acidic than coffee and therefore
    easier on the stomach. Others have become interested in tea drinking since the National Cancer Institute
    published its findings on the antioxidant properties of tea. But whether tea is enjoyed for its perceived health
    benefits, its flavor, or as a social drink, teacups continue to be filled daily with the world’s most popular
    beverage.
    Question 39: According to the passage, what is true about the origin of tea drinking?

    A.

    It began during the Shen Nung dynasty

    B.

    It may have begun sometime around 1650

    C.

    It is unknown when tea first became popular

    D.

    It was originally produced from Camellia plants in Europe

  • Câu hỏi 40:

    Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate
    the correct answer to each of the questions from 36 to 42.

    Ranked as the number one beverage consumed worldwide, tea takes the lead over coffee in both popularity
    and production with more than 5 million tons of tea produced annually. Although much of this tea is
    consumed in Asian, European and African countries, the United States drinks its fair share. According to
    estimates by the Tea Council of the United States, tea is enjoyed by no less than half of the U.S. population
    on any given day. Black tea or green tea - iced, spiced, or instant - tea drinking has spurred a billion-dollar
    business with major tea producers in Africa and South America and throughout Asia.
    Tea is made from the leaves of an evergreen plant, Camellia sinensis, which grows tall and lush in tropical
    regions. On tea plantations, the plant is kept trimmed to approximately four feet high and as new buds called
    flush appear, they are plucked off by hand. Even in today’s world of modern agricultural machinery, hand
    harvesting continues to be the preferred method. Ideally, only the top two leaves and a bud should be
    picked. This new growth produces the highest quality tea.
    After being harvested, tea leaves are laid out on long drying racks, called withering racks, for 18 to 20 hours.
    Next, depending on the type of tea being produced, the leaves may be crushed or chopped to release flavor,
    and then fermented under controlled conditions of heat and humidity. For green tea, the whole leaves are
    often steamed to retain their green color, and the fermentation process is skipped. Producing black teas
    requires fermentation during which the tea leaves begin to darken. After fermentation, black tea is dried in
    vats to produce its rich brown or black color.
    No one knows when or how tea became popular, but legend has it that tea as a beverage, was discovered in
    2737 B.C. by Emperor Shen Nung of China when leaves from a Camellia dropped into his drinking water as it
    was boiling over a fire. As the story goes, Emperor Shen Nung drank the resulting liquid and proclaimed the
    drink to be most nourishing and refreshing. Though this account cannot be documented, it is thought that
    tea drinking probably originated in China and spread to other parts of Asia, then to Europe, and ultimately to
    America colonies around 1650.
    With about half the caffeine content as coffee, tea is often chosen by those who want to reduce, but not
    necessarily eliminate their caffeine intake. Some people find that tea is less acidic than coffee and therefore
    easier on the stomach. Others have become interested in tea drinking since the National Cancer Institute
    published its findings on the antioxidant properties of tea. But whether tea is enjoyed for its perceived health
    benefits, its flavor, or as a social drink, teacups continue to be filled daily with the world’s most popular
    beverage.
    Question 40: The word “eliminate” in paragraph 5 could be best replaced by which of the
    following word?

    A.

    decrease

    B.

    increase

    C.

    reduce

    D.

    remove

  • Câu hỏi 41:

    Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate
    the correct answer to each of the questions from 36 to 42.

    Ranked as the number one beverage consumed worldwide, tea takes the lead over coffee in both popularity
    and production with more than 5 million tons of tea produced annually. Although much of this tea is
    consumed in Asian, European and African countries, the United States drinks its fair share. According to
    estimates by the Tea Council of the United States, tea is enjoyed by no less than half of the U.S. population
    on any given day. Black tea or green tea - iced, spiced, or instant - tea drinking has spurred a billion-dollar
    business with major tea producers in Africa and South America and throughout Asia.
    Tea is made from the leaves of an evergreen plant, Camellia sinensis, which grows tall and lush in tropical
    regions. On tea plantations, the plant is kept trimmed to approximately four feet high and as new buds called
    flush appear, they are plucked off by hand. Even in today’s world of modern agricultural machinery, hand
    harvesting continues to be the preferred method. Ideally, only the top two leaves and a bud should be
    picked. This new growth produces the highest quality tea.
    After being harvested, tea leaves are laid out on long drying racks, called withering racks, for 18 to 20 hours.
    Next, depending on the type of tea being produced, the leaves may be crushed or chopped to release flavor,
    and then fermented under controlled conditions of heat and humidity. For green tea, the whole leaves are
    often steamed to retain their green color, and the fermentation process is skipped. Producing black teas
    requires fermentation during which the tea leaves begin to darken. After fermentation, black tea is dried in
    vats to produce its rich brown or black color.
    No one knows when or how tea became popular, but legend has it that tea as a beverage, was discovered in
    2737 B.C. by Emperor Shen Nung of China when leaves from a Camellia dropped into his drinking water as it
    was boiling over a fire. As the story goes, Emperor Shen Nung drank the resulting liquid and proclaimed the
    drink to be most nourishing and refreshing. Though this account cannot be documented, it is thought that
    tea drinking probably originated in China and spread to other parts of Asia, then to Europe, and ultimately to
    America colonies around 1650.
    With about half the caffeine content as coffee, tea is often chosen by those who want to reduce, but not
    necessarily eliminate their caffeine intake. Some people find that tea is less acidic than coffee and therefore
    easier on the stomach. Others have become interested in tea drinking since the National Cancer Institute
    published its findings on the antioxidant properties of tea. But whether tea is enjoyed for its perceived health
    benefits, its flavor, or as a social drink, teacups continue to be filled daily with the world’s most popular
    beverage.
    Question 41: According to the passage, which may be the reason why someone would choose to
    drink tea instead of coffee?

    A.

    Because it’s easier to digest than coffee

    B.

    Because it has a higher nutritional content than coffee

    C.

    Because it helps prevent cancer

    D.

    Because it has more caffeine than coffee

  • Câu hỏi 42:

    Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate
    the correct answer to each of the questions from 36 to 42.

    Ranked as the number one beverage consumed worldwide, tea takes the lead over coffee in both popularity
    and production with more than 5 million tons of tea produced annually. Although much of this tea is
    consumed in Asian, European and African countries, the United States drinks its fair share. According to
    estimates by the Tea Council of the United States, tea is enjoyed by no less than half of the U.S. population
    on any given day. Black tea or green tea - iced, spiced, or instant - tea drinking has spurred a billion-dollar
    business with major tea producers in Africa and South America and throughout Asia.
    Tea is made from the leaves of an evergreen plant, Camellia sinensis, which grows tall and lush in tropical
    regions. On tea plantations, the plant is kept trimmed to approximately four feet high and as new buds called
    flush appear, they are plucked off by hand. Even in today’s world of modern agricultural machinery, hand
    harvesting continues to be the preferred method. Ideally, only the top two leaves and a bud should be
    picked. This new growth produces the highest quality tea.
    After being harvested, tea leaves are laid out on long drying racks, called withering racks, for 18 to 20 hours.
    Next, depending on the type of tea being produced, the leaves may be crushed or chopped to release flavor,
    and then fermented under controlled conditions of heat and humidity. For green tea, the whole leaves are
    often steamed to retain their green color, and the fermentation process is skipped. Producing black teas
    requires fermentation during which the tea leaves begin to darken. After fermentation, black tea is dried in
    vats to produce its rich brown or black color.
    No one knows when or how tea became popular, but legend has it that tea as a beverage, was discovered in
    2737 B.C. by Emperor Shen Nung of China when leaves from a Camellia dropped into his drinking water as it
    was boiling over a fire. As the story goes, Emperor Shen Nung drank the resulting liquid and proclaimed the
    drink to be most nourishing and refreshing. Though this account cannot be documented, it is thought that
    tea drinking probably originated in China and spread to other parts of Asia, then to Europe, and ultimately to
    America colonies around 1650.
    With about half the caffeine content as coffee, tea is often chosen by those who want to reduce, but not
    necessarily eliminate their caffeine intake. Some people find that tea is less acidic than coffee and therefore
    easier on the stomach. Others have become interested in tea drinking since the National Cancer Institute
    published its findings on the antioxidant properties of tea. But whether tea is enjoyed for its perceived health
    benefits, its flavor, or as a social drink, teacups continue to be filled daily with the world’s most popular
    beverage.
    Question 42: What best describes the topic of this passage?

    A.

    Tea consumption and production

    B.

    The two most popular types of tea

    C.

    The benefits of tea consumption worldwide

    D.

    How tea is produced and brewed

  • Câu hỏi 43:

    Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to choose the
    best answer for each of the question from 43- 50

    In the last third of the nineteenth century a new housing form was quietly being developed. In 1869 the
    Stuyvesant, considered New York’s first apartment house, was built on East Eighteenth Street. The building
    was financed by the developer Rutherfurd Stuyvesant and designed by Richard Morris Hunt, the first
    American architect to graduate from the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris. Each man had lived in Paris, and each
    understood the economic and social potential of this Parisian housing form. But the Stuyvesant was at best a
    limited success. In spite of Hunt’s inviting facade, the living place was awkwardly arranged. Those who could
    afford them were quite content to remain in the more sumptuous, single-family homes, leaving the
    Stuyvesant to young married couple and bachelors.
    The fundamental problem with the Stuyvesant and the other early apartment buildings that quickly followed,
    in the late 1870’s and early 1880’s, was that they were confined to the typical New York building lot. That lot
    was a rectangular area 25 feet wide by 100 feet deep - a shape perfectly suited for a row house. The lot
    could also accommodate a rectangular tenement, though it could not yield the square, well-lighted, and
    logically arranged rooms that great apartment buildings require. But even with the awkward interior
    configurations of the early apartment buildings, the idea caught on. It met the needs of a large and growing
    population that wanted something better than tenements but could not afford or did not want row houses.
    So while the city’s newly emerging social leadership commissioned their mansions, apartment houses and
    hotels began to sprout on multiple lots, thus breaking the initial space constraints. In the closing decades of
    the nineteenth century, large apartment houses began dotting the developed portions of New York City, and
    by the opening decades of the twentieth century, spacious buildings, such as the Dakota and the Ansonia
    finally transcended the tight confinement of row house building lots. From there it was only a small step to
    building luxury apartment houses on the newly created Park Avenue, right next to the fashionable Fifth
    Avenue shopping area.
    Question 43. The new housing form discussed in the passage refers to ________

    A.

    single-family homes

    B.

    apartment buildings

    C.

    row houses

    D.

    hotels

  • Câu hỏi 44:

    Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to choose the
    best answer for each of the question from 43- 50

    In the last third of the nineteenth century a new housing form was quietly being developed. In 1869 the
    Stuyvesant, considered New York’s first apartment house, was built on East Eighteenth Street. The building
    was financed by the developer Rutherfurd Stuyvesant and designed by Richard Morris Hunt, the first
    American architect to graduate from the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris. Each man had lived in Paris, and each
    understood the economic and social potential of this Parisian housing form. But the Stuyvesant was at best a
    limited success. In spite of Hunt’s inviting facade, the living place was awkwardly arranged. Those who could
    afford them were quite content to remain in the more sumptuous, single-family homes, leaving the
    Stuyvesant to young married couple and bachelors.
    The fundamental problem with the Stuyvesant and the other early apartment buildings that quickly followed,
    in the late 1870’s and early 1880’s, was that they were confined to the typical New York building lot. That lot
    was a rectangular area 25 feet wide by 100 feet deep - a shape perfectly suited for a row house. The lot
    could also accommodate a rectangular tenement, though it could not yield the square, well-lighted, and
    logically arranged rooms that great apartment buildings require. But even with the awkward interior
    configurations of the early apartment buildings, the idea caught on. It met the needs of a large and growing
    population that wanted something better than tenements but could not afford or did not want row houses.
    So while the city’s newly emerging social leadership commissioned their mansions, apartment houses and
    hotels began to sprout on multiple lots, thus breaking the initial space constraints. In the closing decades of
    the nineteenth century, large apartment houses began dotting the developed portions of New York City, and
    by the opening decades of the twentieth century, spacious buildings, such as the Dakota and the Ansonia
    finally transcended the tight confinement of row house building lots. From there it was only a small step to
    building luxury apartment houses on the newly created Park Avenue, right next to the fashionable Fifth
    Avenue shopping area.
    Question 44. Why was the Stuyvesant a limited success?

    A.

    The arrangement of the rooms was not convenient

    B.

    Most people could not afford to live there

    C.

    There were no shopping areas nearby

    D.

    It was in a crowded neighborhood

  • Câu hỏi 45:

    Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to choose the
    best answer for each of the question from 43- 50

    In the last third of the nineteenth century a new housing form was quietly being developed. In 1869 the
    Stuyvesant, considered New York’s first apartment house, was built on East Eighteenth Street. The building
    was financed by the developer Rutherfurd Stuyvesant and designed by Richard Morris Hunt, the first
    American architect to graduate from the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris. Each man had lived in Paris, and each
    understood the economic and social potential of this Parisian housing form. But the Stuyvesant was at best a
    limited success. In spite of Hunt’s inviting facade, the living place was awkwardly arranged. Those who could
    afford them were quite content to remain in the more sumptuous, single-family homes, leaving the
    Stuyvesant to young married couple and bachelors.
    The fundamental problem with the Stuyvesant and the other early apartment buildings that quickly followed,
    in the late 1870’s and early 1880’s, was that they were confined to the typical New York building lot. That lot
    was a rectangular area 25 feet wide by 100 feet deep - a shape perfectly suited for a row house. The lot
    could also accommodate a rectangular tenement, though it could not yield the square, well-lighted, and
    logically arranged rooms that great apartment buildings require. But even with the awkward interior
    configurations of the early apartment buildings, the idea caught on. It met the needs of a large and growing
    population that wanted something better than tenements but could not afford or did not want row houses.
    So while the city’s newly emerging social leadership commissioned their mansions, apartment houses and
    hotels began to sprout on multiple lots, thus breaking the initial space constraints. In the closing decades of
    the nineteenth century, large apartment houses began dotting the developed portions of New York City, and
    by the opening decades of the twentieth century, spacious buildings, such as the Dakota and the Ansonia
    finally transcended the tight confinement of row house building lots. From there it was only a small step to
    building luxury apartment houses on the newly created Park Avenue, right next to the fashionable Fifth
    Avenue shopping area.
    Question 45. The word “sumptuous” in paragraph 1 is closest in meaning to ________

    A.

    luxurious

    B.

    unique

    C.

    modem

    D.

    distant

  • Câu hỏi 46:

    Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to choose the
    best answer for each of the question from 43- 50

    In the last third of the nineteenth century a new housing form was quietly being developed. In 1869 the
    Stuyvesant, considered New York’s first apartment house, was built on East Eighteenth Street. The building
    was financed by the developer Rutherfurd Stuyvesant and designed by Richard Morris Hunt, the first
    American architect to graduate from the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris. Each man had lived in Paris, and each
    understood the economic and social potential of this Parisian housing form. But the Stuyvesant was at best a
    limited success. In spite of Hunt’s inviting facade, the living place was awkwardly arranged. Those who could
    afford them were quite content to remain in the more sumptuous, single-family homes, leaving the
    Stuyvesant to young married couple and bachelors.
    The fundamental problem with the Stuyvesant and the other early apartment buildings that quickly followed,
    in the late 1870’s and early 1880’s, was that they were confined to the typical New York building lot. That lot
    was a rectangular area 25 feet wide by 100 feet deep - a shape perfectly suited for a row house. The lot
    could also accommodate a rectangular tenement, though it could not yield the square, well-lighted, and
    logically arranged rooms that great apartment buildings require. But even with the awkward interior
    configurations of the early apartment buildings, the idea caught on. It met the needs of a large and growing
    population that wanted something better than tenements but could not afford or did not want row houses.
    So while the city’s newly emerging social leadership commissioned their mansions, apartment houses and
    hotels began to sprout on multiple lots, thus breaking the initial space constraints. In the closing decades of
    the nineteenth century, large apartment houses began dotting the developed portions of New York City, and
    by the opening decades of the twentieth century, spacious buildings, such as the Dakota and the Ansonia
    finally transcended the tight confinement of row house building lots. From there it was only a small step to
    building luxury apartment houses on the newly created Park Avenue, right next to the fashionable Fifth
    Avenue shopping area.
    Question 46. It can be inferred that the majority of people who lived in New York’s first
    apartments were ________.

    A.

    highly educated

    B.

    unemployed

    C.

    wealthy

    D.

    young

  • Câu hỏi 47:

    Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to choose the
    best answer for each of the question from 43- 50

    In the last third of the nineteenth century a new housing form was quietly being developed. In 1869 the
    Stuyvesant, considered New York’s first apartment house, was built on East Eighteenth Street. The building
    was financed by the developer Rutherfurd Stuyvesant and designed by Richard Morris Hunt, the first
    American architect to graduate from the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris. Each man had lived in Paris, and each
    understood the economic and social potential of this Parisian housing form. But the Stuyvesant was at best a
    limited success. In spite of Hunt’s inviting facade, the living place was awkwardly arranged. Those who could
    afford them were quite content to remain in the more sumptuous, single-family homes, leaving the
    Stuyvesant to young married couple and bachelors.
    The fundamental problem with the Stuyvesant and the other early apartment buildings that quickly followed,
    in the late 1870’s and early 1880’s, was that they were confined to the typical New York building lot. That lot
    was a rectangular area 25 feet wide by 100 feet deep - a shape perfectly suited for a row house. The lot
    could also accommodate a rectangular tenement, though it could not yield the square, well-lighted, and
    logically arranged rooms that great apartment buildings require. But even with the awkward interior
    configurations of the early apartment buildings, the idea caught on. It met the needs of a large and growing
    population that wanted something better than tenements but could not afford or did not want row houses.
    So while the city’s newly emerging social leadership commissioned their mansions, apartment houses and
    hotels began to sprout on multiple lots, thus breaking the initial space constraints. In the closing decades of
    the nineteenth century, large apartment houses began dotting the developed portions of New York City, and
    by the opening decades of the twentieth century, spacious buildings, such as the Dakota and the Ansonia
    finally transcended the tight confinement of row house building lots. From there it was only a small step to
    building luxury apartment houses on the newly created Park Avenue, right next to the fashionable Fifth
    Avenue shopping area.
    Question 47. The word “they” in the passage refers to ________.

    A.

    fundamental problems

    B.

    the Stuyvesant

    C.

    modern apartment buildings

    D.

    early apartment buildings

  • Câu hỏi 48:

    Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to choose the
    best answer for each of the question from 43- 50

    In the last third of the nineteenth century a new housing form was quietly being developed. In 1869 the
    Stuyvesant, considered New York’s first apartment house, was built on East Eighteenth Street. The building
    was financed by the developer Rutherfurd Stuyvesant and designed by Richard Morris Hunt, the first
    American architect to graduate from the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris. Each man had lived in Paris, and each
    understood the economic and social potential of this Parisian housing form. But the Stuyvesant was at best a
    limited success. In spite of Hunt’s inviting facade, the living place was awkwardly arranged. Those who could
    afford them were quite content to remain in the more sumptuous, single-family homes, leaving the
    Stuyvesant to young married couple and bachelors.
    The fundamental problem with the Stuyvesant and the other early apartment buildings that quickly followed,
    in the late 1870’s and early 1880’s, was that they were confined to the typical New York building lot. That lot
    was a rectangular area 25 feet wide by 100 feet deep - a shape perfectly suited for a row house. The lot
    could also accommodate a rectangular tenement, though it could not yield the square, well-lighted, and
    logically arranged rooms that great apartment buildings require. But even with the awkward interior
    configurations of the early apartment buildings, the idea caught on. It met the needs of a large and growing
    population that wanted something better than tenements but could not afford or did not want row houses.
    So while the city’s newly emerging social leadership commissioned their mansions, apartment houses and
    hotels began to sprout on multiple lots, thus breaking the initial space constraints. In the closing decades of
    the nineteenth century, large apartment houses began dotting the developed portions of New York City, and
    by the opening decades of the twentieth century, spacious buildings, such as the Dakota and the Ansonia
    finally transcended the tight confinement of row house building lots. From there it was only a small step to
    building luxury apartment houses on the newly created Park Avenue, right next to the fashionable Fifth
    Avenue shopping area.
    Question 48. It can be inferred that a New York apartment building in the 1870’s and 1880’s had
    all of the following characteristics EXCEPT________

    A.

    Its room arrangement was not logical

    B.

    It was rectangular

    C.

    It was spacious inside

    D.

    It had limited light

  • Câu hỏi 49:

    Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to choose the
    best answer for each of the question from 43- 50

    In the last third of the nineteenth century a new housing form was quietly being developed. In 1869 the
    Stuyvesant, considered New York’s first apartment house, was built on East Eighteenth Street. The building
    was financed by the developer Rutherfurd Stuyvesant and designed by Richard Morris Hunt, the first
    American architect to graduate from the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris. Each man had lived in Paris, and each
    understood the economic and social potential of this Parisian housing form. But the Stuyvesant was at best a
    limited success. In spite of Hunt’s inviting facade, the living place was awkwardly arranged. Those who could
    afford them were quite content to remain in the more sumptuous, single-family homes, leaving the
    Stuyvesant to young married couple and bachelors.
    The fundamental problem with the Stuyvesant and the other early apartment buildings that quickly followed,
    in the late 1870’s and early 1880’s, was that they were confined to the typical New York building lot. That lot
    was a rectangular area 25 feet wide by 100 feet deep - a shape perfectly suited for a row house. The lot
    could also accommodate a rectangular tenement, though it could not yield the square, well-lighted, and
    logically arranged rooms that great apartment buildings require. But even with the awkward interior
    configurations of the early apartment buildings, the idea caught on. It met the needs of a large and growing
    population that wanted something better than tenements but could not afford or did not want row houses.
    So while the city’s newly emerging social leadership commissioned their mansions, apartment houses and
    hotels began to sprout on multiple lots, thus breaking the initial space constraints. In the closing decades of
    the nineteenth century, large apartment houses began dotting the developed portions of New York City, and
    by the opening decades of the twentieth century, spacious buildings, such as the Dakota and the Ansonia
    finally transcended the tight confinement of row house building lots. From there it was only a small step to
    building luxury apartment houses on the newly created Park Avenue, right next to the fashionable Fifth
    Avenue shopping area.
    Question 49. Why did the idea of living in an apartment become popular in the late 1880’s?

    A.

    Large families needed housing with sufficient space

    B.

    Apartments were preferable to tenements and cheaper than row houses

    C.

    The city officials of “New York wanted housing that was centrally located

    D.

    The shape of early apartments could accommodate a variety of interior designs

  • Câu hỏi 50:

    Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C or D on your answer sheet to choose the
    best answer for each of the question from 43- 50

    In the last third of the nineteenth century a new housing form was quietly being developed. In 1869 the
    Stuyvesant, considered New York’s first apartment house, was built on East Eighteenth Street. The building
    was financed by the developer Rutherfurd Stuyvesant and designed by Richard Morris Hunt, the first
    American architect to graduate from the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris. Each man had lived in Paris, and each
    understood the economic and social potential of this Parisian housing form. But the Stuyvesant was at best a
    limited success. In spite of Hunt’s inviting facade, the living place was awkwardly arranged. Those who could
    afford them were quite content to remain in the more sumptuous, single-family homes, leaving the
    Stuyvesant to young married couple and bachelors.
    The fundamental problem with the Stuyvesant and the other early apartment buildings that quickly followed,
    in the late 1870’s and early 1880’s, was that they were confined to the typical New York building lot. That lot
    was a rectangular area 25 feet wide by 100 feet deep - a shape perfectly suited for a row house. The lot
    could also accommodate a rectangular tenement, though it could not yield the square, well-lighted, and
    logically arranged rooms that great apartment buildings require. But even with the awkward interior
    configurations of the early apartment buildings, the idea caught on. It met the needs of a large and growing
    population that wanted something better than tenements but could not afford or did not want row houses.
    So while the city’s newly emerging social leadership commissioned their mansions, apartment houses and
    hotels began to sprout on multiple lots, thus breaking the initial space constraints. In the closing decades of
    the nineteenth century, large apartment houses began dotting the developed portions of New York City, and
    by the opening decades of the twentieth century, spacious buildings, such as the Dakota and the Ansonia
    finally transcended the tight confinement of row house building lots. From there it was only a small step to
    building luxury apartment houses on the newly created Park Avenue, right next to the fashionable Fifth
    Avenue shopping area.
    Question 50. The author mentions the Dakota and the Ansonia in paragraph 3 because
    ________.

    A.

    they are examples of large, well-designed apartment buildings

    B.

    their design is similar to that of row houses

    C.

    they were built on a single building lot

    D.

    they are famous hotels